When time and funding permit, each flower (each plant species) will have its own page, and its own PDF, and eventually its own PPT so that professors and students have plenty of material on Guatemala (and Honduras, etc) to study.

Heliconia adflexa, Coban, Guatemala, Hotel Monja Blanca, FLAAR, by Nicholas Hellmuth

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Reports by FLAAR Mesoamerica
on Flora & Fauna of Parque Nacional Yaxha Nakum Naranjo
Peten, Guatemala, Central America


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Bibliography on Montriacardia arborescens

Montrichardia arborescens is an arborescent grass with straight stem, greyish, unbranched and sometimes has thorns. Its large globose seeds float to shore to germinate growing along rivers, banks, swamps or creeks to a maximum height of 3 m. It has arrow shaped leaves that are food sources for animal species. The plant produces inflorescences which then leave an edible fruit and can be cooked. Its fruiting spadices produces large infructescences, which contain about 80 edible yellow fruits according to One (2015). It occurs in British Honduras and Guatemala to Lesser Antillas and the Guinanas, in wet soil, most often in mud along the borders of tidal swamps or streams (World Flora Online, n.d.).

Robertt (2017) mentions different medicinal uses of this plant:

  • Sap: To treat coughs and colds.
  • Stem: For diabetes, tuberculosis, thrush, colds; juice for remedying sting of stingray, warts.
  • Stem and Leaf: In Surinam, the finely ground tops of plants are stuffed into the nostrils to stop nosebleed.
  • Leaf: For eyelid inflammation, boiled leaves are used in baths for remedying skin conditions and they are also used for the treatment of diabetes and tuberculosis.
  • Taxonomy:

    ORDER

    Alismatales

    FAMILY

    Araceae

    SUBFAMILY

    Aroideae

    GENUS

    Montrichardia

    SPECIES

    Montrichardia arborescenseae

    COMMON NAME

    Pica pica

You can find more information about this plant in the following bibliography.

PDF, Articles, Books on Montriacardia arborescens

  • BOUBER, Chafika and Denis BARABÉ
  • 2016
  • Flower and Inflorescence Development in Montrichardia arborescens (L.) Schott (Araceae). International Journal of Plant Sciences, Vol. 158, No. 4, pp. 408-417

    Available Online:
    www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/297450
  • COLONNRLLO, Guiseppe, RODRÍGUEZ, Leyda and Rafael GUINAGLIA
  • 2021
  • Caracterización estructural y florística de un bosque con palmas anegado (Chaguaramal), Península de Paria, Estado Sucre, Venezuela. Acta Botánica Venezuela. 35 (1), pages 1-26

    Downloadable Online:
    www.redalyc.org/pdf/862/86225571001.pdf
  • CROAT, Thomas B., FERNÁNDEZ, G. C. and I. GONZÁLEZ
  • 2005
  • Montrichardia arborescens (L.) Schott (Araceae) Newly Reported for Mexico. Aroideana, Vol. 28.

    Downloadable Online:
    www.aroid.org/gallery/croat/0280011.pdf
  • FUNDACION DEFENSORES DE LA NATURALEZA
  • 2003
  • Refugio de vida silvestre Bocas del Polochic, II Plan Maestro 2003-2007. Fundación Defensores De La Naturaleza.

    https://rsis.ramsar.org/RISapp/files/657/documents/GT813mgt_SP.pdf

    En los cuerpos de agua se encuentra una vegetación particular, la presencia de Chara vulgaris, Ceratopteris pteridoides, Acrostichum daneaefolium, Azolla caroliniana, Salvinia auriculata, Nymphaea ampla, Utricularia foliosa, Jussiaea natans, Hymenocalis littoralis, Pistia stratiotes, Vallisneria americana, Pontederia sagittata y Typha dominguensis, señalado por Scott y Carbonell 1,986. Además se determinó como más abundantes y representativas a la “ninfa de agua” (N. Ampla), “músico” (Montrichardia arborescens), “lechuga de agua” (Pontederia sp.) y “lechuguilla” (P. stratiotes. (Villar, 1992) (page 16).

  • FUNDACIÓN PARA EL FORTALECIMIENTO DE LA FRUTICULTURA Y PLANTAS ALIMENTICIAS NO CONVENCIONALES EN COLOMBIA
  • 2018
  • Frutos Comestibles Silvestres y Cultivados de Colombia. Inventario total de frutas, nueces y semillas silvestres cultivadas en Colombia.

    Montrichardia arborescens apprears on page 26. The seeds are edible.

    Available online, not available for download:
    https://issuu.com/fffpancc/docs/los_frutos_comestibles_silvestres_y_cultivados_de_
  • HALL, Louisa
  • 2016
  • Monstrous deliciousness and devilish fruit - Kew's edible aroids. 1 web page.

    and the 'fruit of the devil'? This is Montrichardia arborescens, cultivated in South America for its starchy tubers, and acquired its nickname due to its irresistible fruiting spadices which produce large infructescences, each containing about 80 edible yellow fruits. (Hall 2016).

    Downloadable:
    www.kew.org/read-and-watch/edible-aroids
  • HARRIS, Roger and Peter HUTCHISON
  • 2011
  • Amazonas. Guias Bradt. Alhena Media. 432 pages.

    (Montrichardia arborescens) es común a lo largo de los ríos lentos de igapó. Crece sobre un tallo alto y corpulento y tiene un enorme espádice comestible parecido a la piña. (page 111).
  • STANDLEY, Paul C. and Julian A. STEYERMARK
  • 1958
  • Flora of Guatemala, Fieldiana, Botany, Volume 24, Part I. Chicago Natural History Museum.

    Montrichardia arborescens (L.) Schott, Arac. Betreff. 1: 4. 1854. Arum arborescens L. Sp. PI. ed. 2. 371. 1763. Masica.

    Occasional in tidal swamps of the North Coast, usually growing in shallow water; Izabal. British Honduras to Panama, Lesser Antilles,

    Venezuela, and the Guianas. Figure 57.

    Caudex as much as 3 meters high but usually lower, 1.5-2 cm. thick or toward the base much thicker, the internodes about 1 cm. long, smooth or slightly aculeolate petioles 20-30 cm. long, the sheath extending above the middle; blades 20-30 cm. long or often much larger, deeply sagittate, the basal lobes retrorse, triangular-lanceolate, acuminate, the anterior lobe triangular or ovate-triangular, short-cuspidate or obtuse, the primary costal nerves 3-4 on each side, united to form an obscure collective nerve close to the margin; peduncles half as long as the spathe; spathe oblong-ovate, cuspidate, 10-13 cm. long, 6-7 cm. wide, white; spadix very thick and stout, the staminate portion 7 cm. long, the pistillate part one-third as long; berries 1-1.5 cm. in diameter. The large white spathes are conspicuous and handsome, suggesting those of the cultivated calla (Zantedeschia). (pages 335 and 337).
  • WEBER, M. and H. HALBRITTER
  • 2006
  • Exploding pollen in Montrichardia arborescens (Araceae). Plant Systematics and Evolution volume 263, pages51–57

 

Suggested webpages with photos and information on Montriacardia arborescens

https://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/Aroideth.htm
Montrichardia arborescens is eaten in many areas of Tropical America, the seeds are 'cooked or toasted' each inflorescence containing about 80 seeds.

https://colombia.inaturalist.org/taxa/362191-Montrichardia-arborescens
Information and nice photos

www.invasive.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=55417&fam=37
Useful photos

www.jungledragon.com/image/87913/montrichardia_arborescens.html
Amazing photo and information about the edible uses.

www.naturalista.mx/taxa/362191-Montrichardia-arborescens
Photos and map distribution.

www.natureloveyou.sg/Montrichardia%20arborescens/Main.html
Useful photos.

www.thingsguyana.com/moco-moco-healing-plant-of-the-guianas/
Information and uses

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-129694
Synonyms

www.tramil.net/es/plant/montrichardia-arborescens
Nice photos

https://tropilab.com/mokomoko.html
General information and photos

http://webserv.fq.edu.uy/tematres/index.php?tema=12520&/montrichardia-arborescens-l-schott
Plant uses

www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-0000245847;jsessionid=A1139D5591F7442B9E8A1A025A52BE69
General Information

 

First posted October, 2021

 

Parque Nacional Yaxha, Nakum and Naranjo

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